Martín Urdiales Shaw
Profesor Titular de Universidade
 +34 986 812 366

 Member information 

  TEACHING   

 

  • UNDERGRADUATE 

Due to the configuration of the syllabus as a Degree in Foreign Languages ("Grao en Linguas Estranxeiras")  I currently have to combine a freshman English course (Inglés IV - first year students) in the second semester, together with a course on my field, American Literature, designated Ambitos II, for 3rd year students.

  • POSTGRADUATE

Within the inter-University Master's Program "Estudos Ingleses Avanzados" I teach a course on Modern Literature and the City, which brings under discussion 20th century American novels (1900-1945) which share an emphasis on representations of the "urban" as viewed through characters shaped by city influences. I also teach one section of a methodological course (aimed at students of humanities) on the use of MLA Style , with a particular emphasis on the creation of the specific syntax of Works Cited entries and lists,  and an overview of different publication types and how they should be referenced in scholarly writing.


 RESEARCH INTERESTS 

 

I belong to the research group NETEC (Textual and Cultural Negotiations) which can be accessed by clicking under my affiliation details above or by clicking here.

 

I work on American 20th century literature, mainly specializing in the fields of Jewish American narrative, 1930s urban fiction, American popular culture, graphic novels and Holocaust Studies. My publications include a monograph on Bernard Malamud’s fiction (Ethnic Identities in Bernard Malamud's Fiction, 2000), and articles and book chapters on the works of Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, Art Spiegelman, Henry Roth, Clifford Odets, and Tillie Olsen, among others. I have also ocassionally worked on other periods / writers within the American literary canon, such as Edgar Allan Poe, Anne Bradstreet or Rudolfo Anaya. 

My research in the period 2010-2014 focused principally on Art Spiegelman's MAUS, where I worked in two different fields, one relating to issues of translatability of original languages ("Between Transmission and Translation: The Rearticulation of Valdek's Spiegelman's Languages in Maus" ; Translation and Literature 24:1 , Spring 2015) and another concerning the relational nature of grapho-textual representational strategies ("Reaching Beyond the Commix/ture: Art Spiegelman's Maus as Relational Genre"; Relational Designs in Literature and the Arts, Rodopi IFAVL series no. 158, 2012).  I have also worked on Spiegelman's post 9/11 work In the Shadow of No Towers.

Over the past three years, my research has involved a book chapter on the translations of Bernard Malamud's novel The Fixer into Spanish, with the title "Fixing Bernard Malamud’s The Fixer through Translation: From El Hombre de Kiev (1967) to El Reparador (2011)"  in the volume Bernard Malamud: A Centennial Tribute (Wayne State UP, 2016) which brings together contributions from both American and European specialists in the the work of Malamud.  In 2016, I was to invited to contribute a book chapter on "Race and Cultural Politics in Bellow's Fiction" for The Cambridge Companion to Saul Bellow, edited by Victoria Aarons, which has just been released in February 2017. My work in the field of Translation in relation to the Holocaust has also continued through a review of Jean Boase-Beier's Translating the Poetry of the Holocaust (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015) recently published in Translation and Literature (26 : 1, Spring 2017).